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We're all in this together
07-09-2020, 02:04 PM (This post was last modified: 07-09-2020 02:07 PM by Warri the Wombat.)
Post: #1
We're all in this together
This tread provides opportunities to share examples of people going out of their way to support people affected by COVID 19 lock downs and other disasters such as fires, floods or accidents.

This was my inspiration. I will look for other examples.

[Image: food-deliveries.jpg]

Quote:Last night union members delivered dinner and groceries to 20 floors of people in hard lock down, inside just one of the 9 public housing towers in Melbourne.

An incredible effort organised by Victorian Trades Hall Council. This is what solidarity looks like. No one should be left behind during this crisis.

"When your opponent is destroying himself, don't interrupt him." Napoleon
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07-09-2020, 03:49 PM
Post: #2
RE: We're all in this together
As I understand it, the Sikh community have been doing that for months.
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07-09-2020, 04:18 PM
Post: #3
RE: We're all in this together
it looks like the food distribution was handled badly in the towers by the andrews government...
lot of stories floating around....
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07-09-2020, 04:20 PM (This post was last modified: 07-09-2020 04:23 PM by Warri the Wombat.)
Post: #4
RE: We're all in this together
Yes, Totc, they have. They are lovely people and have a Gurdwara near me.

They are also helping out with the people in hard lockdown in social housing towers in Melbourne.

Members of Sikh Volunteers Australia are joining community groups by serving hundreds of free meals to the residents of public housing estates facing lockdown in the inner city suburbs of Melbourne.

https://www.sbs.com.au/language/english/...-melbourne

https://www.sbs.com.au/language/english/...ring-covid

"When your opponent is destroying himself, don't interrupt him." Napoleon
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07-09-2020, 05:23 PM
Post: #5
RE: We're all in this together
Another group in Melbourne is organising to help the people in hard lock down in Melbourne - they are members of the Somali community.

[Image: Somali-volunteers.jpg]

Quote:Donations flooded the centre. Volunteers from across Melbourne arrived ready to support any way they could. Key volunteers came from Carlton and surrounding suburbs, mostly young African people were on the frontlines. They had used social media to reach out to friends, relatives and others locked in the housing estates to ask what they needed and then got to work.

When I arrived on day one, I was astonished by how organised and efficient the volunteers were. Some of the meals that were provided by The Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), were circulated online by residents. Many non-perishable foods had perished. This food was well past the use by date. Meal packs had still not been delivered to the 3000 residents, who were hungry and anxiously waiting for any information on what would happen next.

AMSSA centre, largely headed by the youth faction prepared adequate meals and supply packs. These packages included fresh produce, culturally appropriate meals (halal), and essentials like, baby formula, nappies and female hygiene products. Volunteers walked across from the AMSSA centre armed with bags of food and delivered them to the foyer of the apartment blocks. This continued for hours.

Car loads of donations were taken down the road to the Flemington housing estates and Kensington.

https://www.eurekastreet.com.au/article/...vnGbLQC50#

"When your opponent is destroying himself, don't interrupt him." Napoleon
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07-09-2020, 05:46 PM
Post: #6
RE: We're all in this together
The Mussies were doing similar during the bushfires which was a pleasant and I'm (almost) ashamed to say, surprise.

But then, the Salvos, the CWA etc have been doing it for a century or more, it's good to see that the new people are taking up the load but let's not forget the ones who have always been there.

What it does show is that no one in the government gave it a moments thought. Rather odd really that the People's Republic should have completely overlooked the needs of the people it is supposed to be 'protecting'
Logistics is obviously not their strong suit. Good at politicking, shite at governing.

Heard a term for those Housing towers pertaining to the virus outbreak.
Vertical Cruise ship petrie dishes. Not wrong!

Nick Reece (Left member of Melbourne City Council, regular panelist on a few SKY shows) is looking pretty downcast at the performance of State govt and as a long time Councillor is very familiar with those blocks. He says they should have demolished years ago and wants the rest of us, through the Fed's budget, to build them new ones.

Which begs the question: Why didn't their own most popular 'leader' evva rebuild the bloody thins??
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07-09-2020, 10:57 PM
Post: #7
RE: We're all in this together
When I was housing officer at RAAF Tottenham, we had a few floors in each of the earlier versions of those vertical ghettos as married quarters.

Circa 1970 .... shocking places. Lifts were often not working or were unusable because they had been used as latrines. Broken windows, graffiti, rubbish in the corridors. IMNSHO, our people should have been paid to stay there.

Some of the detached single storey married quarters in Braybrook and Sunshine were almost as bad. Prefabricated, many were literally coming apart at the seams with inch or wider separation of the walls at the corners. I remember one that had a large thistle growing thru a crack into the living room. Unwanted Melbourne Winter ventilation.

Now I’ve finished my astrology degree, who knows what the future holds?
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07-09-2020, 11:31 PM
Post: #8
RE: We're all in this together
Sounds like the 'weekender' Dad rented from a bloke he knew on the coast at Stuart's Point back in the 70s. He and Mum went up to check on the block of land he'd bought (with her money, unknown to her!) and he was too tight to book into a motel so got the key to the shack for 20 bucks.

Mum said it was leaning to one side, was absolutely stinking filthy inside the 'kitchen' was a primus and a tin tub for water as a 'sink'. Fishing shack. But what sent her really off the edge was the rats popping their heads up through a hole in the floor.

Needless to say he had to shell out for the Motel. [Image: yellow-laughing-smiley-emoticon.gif]
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07-09-2020, 11:43 PM
Post: #9
RE: We're all in this together
A first hand account of the Melbourne Towers from a nurse sent to take swabs from the residents. From Facebook. The nurse's name is Lisa Peters. It seems that no matter what the media reports, the people are all in it together, and co-operating.

Quote:Today I have time to think and recall, so I want to clear up some misconceptions of the Covid19 lockdowns in the public towers. You, my family and friends have shown so much concern and support, and this is also a great debriefing for me. This is probably jumbled to read, but whilst things are fresh in my mind I wanted to write it down.

The last few days have been a plethora of emotions and a humbling experience. After working with the community for Covid19 testing, I was unsure what we would experience at the public housing towers, where they were under total lockdown. The media had portrayed them as being full of hostility, drug and alcohol concerns, and as I saw it, a frightening place to go. They had shown residents pleading for help for food and basic supplies, protests and a lot of anger.

Over the last few days, our amazing team from Knox attended the towers in Flemington and North Melbourne. When I first arrived and found the massive police presence and strict lock down, my heart was in my mouth. I have not been exposed to public housing, violence or police incidents. The media were set up outside in the roads and I was reminded of the news stories I had seen. We were guided in to don our PPE and then our teams were the first to be gathered to start working our way through each floor.

We waited for what seemed like an eternity whilst the logistics of the police accompanying us were coordinated. We were in teams of two nurses and two police and had a trolley set up with all our needs. Its weird, as this trolley became “ours” and was part of our team and we were so protective of it. At one stage we had to leave it downstairs when we doffed and had a quick break for a drink in a different building. We entrusted the police to guard it. Well that didn’t work as when we got back a box of gloves was gone. From then on, for the next two days we placed a piece of paper with “Fiona and Lisa’s trolley, please do not touch”. I’m sure there is a psychological reason for this attachment as we became very possessive.

We were given a list of residents on each floor and started at the first apartment and continued until the last had been visited on each floor. The tests were purely voluntary, yet not one resident said no. They were incredibly thankful, respectful and grateful for us being there. We started writing our names on our gowns as we were wearing full PPE and all they could see were our eyes. The police stood back away from them and us, showing the same respect and kindness at every door we knocked at.

At every apartment, we asked are you okay? Do you have enough food, do you need any medications, is there anything we can do to help? There were some very simple requests, lactose free milk, an onion and tomato, dish-washing detergent, sanitary pads and toothpaste. We could see the bags and boxes of food delivered to them in the foyers, under tents outside, outside their doorways, inside their rooms. One man told us they had never had this much meat before, with the biggest smile on his face.

After each floor was completed, we came back down to “doff” which is to remove our PPE in a particular way to not contaminate ourselves or others. We had teams of paramedics to assist with each step. They possibly thought their job was insignificant, but it was just as important as ours. One little break in our PPE and we could become the next cause of community transmission. With that weighing on my mind, and of course the safety of our immediate family, I have never been so anxious about doffing in my decades of nursing! The police were guided as well and they too were grateful as I’m sure they were as anxious as we were.

We then cleaned and restocked our trolley, donned PPE and set off again with a new list and more amazing and beautiful residents to test. At one stage on the first day when we were donned waiting to go in, I looked up at the frightened people on the third-floor balconies watching us from behind the glass. We sent the biggest, animated kisses with both hands to them and they were delighted! We continued to blow kisses backwards and forwards and it made my heart so full knowing that they knew we really do care.

The first day we worked there was no food available at a quick lunch break as it had all been eaten. There were a lot of hungry nurses lol. There were 10 teams of us who agreed to stay on and try and get through the swabbing, and we swabbed until 9pm. We had to stop as its unfair on the residents to keep going later than that. We were disappointed to find there were a couple of floors left, but we had done each building at Flemington Road towers by then, an amazing effort by so many.

Yesterday was the North Melbourne towers. We attended 3 different towers. The first one the lift was broken. We were meant to start at 18th floor. I said I could go up the stairs for a few floors, but not many as we had to carry our trolleys with us. We were lucky to have the first floor and when we had finished there, the lift was fixed.

Again, the residents were so grateful for being tested. They were so worried for their health and that of their families. They proudly showed their negative results on the texts on their phones and wanted to be tested again as that was a week ago. Most were worried about not being able to go to work and support their families or lose their jobs. For many there were single parents because the spouse had been locked out, some had nieces, nephews, cousins etc that had been locked in. There were some laughs at not knowing the birth dates of these young relatives. These people had simple requests as well. We were so lucky to have a social worker with us yesterday as she was able to arrange what was needed then and there.

My heart was full when I left thanks to the “I love you” said to us, the constant thanks and displays of gratitude. We were invited into many homes, even offered a tea or coffee. I went into a few rooms with elderly, frail and young children. This was optional and only if we felt safe. We did, we felt like guests. I saw many, many boxes of food and supplies at the three towers we attended yesterday.

I have so many wonderful memories of the last few days, none were bad, they were all positive. So please understand that whatever the media portrays is not necessarily true. We were there with firsthand experience. The wheels are in motion to support these people, maybe it was slow to happen, but from what I saw it has now been put in place. There are translators, social workers, support systems and many resources out there.

I want to express my thanks and gratitude to the most incredible nurses from Knox that I have had the honour to work alongside. We have supported each other and together we have made an incredible difference to these peoples lives. I am so honored to be a nurse and have each of your backs, as you have mine!

"When your opponent is destroying himself, don't interrupt him." Napoleon
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07-09-2020, 11:53 PM
Post: #10
RE: We're all in this together
2 smiling female nurses are bound to inspire less fear and resistance than just the cops turning up.

But there's good and bad in all groups I don't for one second believe that there are no drug addicts, muggers, or gangsters in those buildings at all. They have families too.
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